You are here:
  1. Visit
  2. Exhibition
  3. Permanent Exhibition

vista sala III

Sorolla occupies what was the artist's family home from 1911. The collections are displayed in all areas of the home open to the public, and the house has been preserved almost intact with the decoration it had during the artist’s lifetime. The collection of paintings therefore stands alongside the furniture and objects originally in the home. This is one of the best preserved artist’s homes in the whole of Europe

The positioning of the paintings normally on display may vary from hall to hall because the Museum organises its own temporary exhibitions and also lends pieces for exhibitions organised by other institutions. The Museum is in the habit of rearranging the walls so that no empty spaces are left by the pieces out on

Gardens

Gardens

Access to the Museum is via the Garden, which surrounds the house on both sides.

Andalusian Courtyard

Andalusian Courtyard

At the bottom of the garden, after descending some steps, we have the Andalusian Courtyard where the ticket and information desks, shop, cloakroom and visitor toilets are located

Room I

Room I

Room I was used as a workshop and storeroom for canvases and frames, and had no decoration

Room II

Room II

Room II was Sorolla’s office and a sort of exhibition gallery where he would hang his recent works

Room III

Room III

Room III was Sorolla’s studio and is undoubtedly the most impressive and representative space in the museum

Rooms IV, V, VI and VII

Rooms IV, V, VI and VII

The main staircase (of wood, between the studios and the salon) leads the visitor to the Temporary Exhibition Rooms

Salon

Salon

The Salon was decorated by Sorolla with family portraits

Ante-room and dining room

Ante-room and dining room

The Area adjoining the dining room is a very cosy space with a window overlooking the first garden

Subir